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Digital Printing Frequently Asked Questions

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Color Graphics (9)

How can I make sure the graphics I submit are high quality?

Format and save your graphic images using a suitable graphics processing program that will allow you to create the images as PostScript (PS), Encapsulated PostScript (EPS), Portable Document Format (PDF), Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Tagged Image File Format (TIFF), size them and adjust the resolution size to 300dpi at the size they will be printed.

What is bleed and do I need it?

Bleed is the industry term for any color or image that goes right to the edge of the paper. What actually happens is that the picture or other graphic extends beyond the edge of the page and that excess image or color is then cut off as a part of the bindery or finishing process. The way to create bleed is to simply make certain that the image or graphic extends off the edge of the page to a distance of 1/4″ wherever you want something to bleed.

Do you prefer RGB or CMYK?

There are many books and articles written about the way different color spaces are represented by different devices. This short response will hopefully answer your immediate questions regarding how to get the optimal result from the work you send us.

RGB and CMYK refer to the type of color space that is used to create the image or design. Typically, photographs are in RGB color space while vector artwork is in the CMYK color space. There are many points of view regarding the best color space for your output. While we work with many combinations of images and artwork in different color space, we get the best results when the image we are reproducing stays within the same color space.

Even with each color space there are different profiles that you can use. A very popular profile is sRGB. While the color gamut of sRGB is more limited than Adobe RGB or ProPhoto, sRGB is the most pervasive color space available and is typically the best color space to use if your image will end up on a website. For the best results please be consistent in the color space that you use and let us know which color space you are using so that we can make the proper adjustments on our equipment.

If there are specific colors that you need to be represented in a specific way, providing us a sample image or requesting a proof will yield the best results.

What size is a large format print?

The distinguishing factor in the size difference between large and small format is the type of machine that we run the copy or print. Our small format process uses sheet fed material that is 12″ x 18″ or smaller, while our large format printers utilize roll fed material and vary between 36″ to 96″ maximum widths.

What should the resolution for my image or graphic be?

For printing small format images (12″ x 18″ or less) the image should be set at 300 dpi. For a large format print, the resolution can be as low as 150 dpi images, depending on viewing distance. Please note that graphics pulled from a website tend to be 72 dpi and reproduce very poorly. Avoid using those graphics because they will look pixelated when printed.

Do you have samples?

Yes! We have sample sets for every department. Whether you are setting up your next color graphics project, proposal, or looking at supplies for your office, we are able to provide you with samples. Contact us to request yours.

What types of files do you accept?

PDF (Portable Document Format) is the most common and preferred file format for submitting digital prints. For the Color Graphics department it is most ideal for you to send us both the native file as well as a PDF document (we have the latest version of the Adobe Creative software). If you are sending us black and white work a PDF will work the best. When sending us a PDF document please make certain that all images and fonts are embedded in the file.

What fonts should I use when creating my graphic files?

You can use any type of postscript font that you wish provided that you either outline the font or embed them into a PDF. Some fonts may be native only to your operating system; without the fonts embedded, parts of the graphic may be distorted or missing when opened on another computer.

What is a “proof”?

A proof is a way of ensuring that your end product will meet your needs. Upon request, we will provide a proof which will be sent to you online or printed on paper which can be viewed in our store or delivered to you in person.

Digital File Management (1)

What types of files do you accept?

PDF (Portable Document Format) is the most common and preferred file format for submitting digital prints. For the Color Graphics department it is most ideal for you to send us both the native file as well as a PDF document (we have the latest version of the Adobe Creative software). If you are sending us black and white work a PDF will work the best. When sending us a PDF document please make certain that all images and fonts are embedded in the file.

Equipment & Supplies (1)

Do you have samples?

Yes! We have sample sets for every department. Whether you are setting up your next color graphics project, proposal, or looking at supplies for your office, we are able to provide you with samples. Contact us to request yours.

Reprographics (7)

What fonts should I use when creating my graphic files?

You can use any type of postscript font that you wish provided that you either outline the font or embed them into a PDF. Some fonts may be native only to your operating system; without the fonts embedded, parts of the graphic may be distorted or missing when opened on another computer.

What should the resolution for my image or graphic be?

For printing small format images (12″ x 18″ or less) the image should be set at 300 dpi. For a large format print, the resolution can be as low as 150 dpi images, depending on viewing distance. Please note that graphics pulled from a website tend to be 72 dpi and reproduce very poorly. Avoid using those graphics because they will look pixelated when printed.

What size is a large format print?

The distinguishing factor in the size difference between large and small format is the type of machine that we run the copy or print. Our small format process uses sheet fed material that is 12″ x 18″ or smaller, while our large format printers utilize roll fed material and vary between 36″ to 96″ maximum widths.

Do you have samples?

Yes! We have sample sets for every department. Whether you are setting up your next color graphics project, proposal, or looking at supplies for your office, we are able to provide you with samples. Contact us to request yours.

What types of files do you accept?

PDF (Portable Document Format) is the most common and preferred file format for submitting digital prints. For the Color Graphics department it is most ideal for you to send us both the native file as well as a PDF document (we have the latest version of the Adobe Creative software). If you are sending us black and white work a PDF will work the best. When sending us a PDF document please make certain that all images and fonts are embedded in the file.

What is bleed and do I need it?

Bleed is the industry term for any color or image that goes right to the edge of the paper. What actually happens is that the picture or other graphic extends beyond the edge of the page and that excess image or color is then cut off as a part of the bindery or finishing process. The way to create bleed is to simply make certain that the image or graphic extends off the edge of the page to a distance of 1/4″ wherever you want something to bleed.

What is a “proof”?

A proof is a way of ensuring that your end product will meet your needs. Upon request, we will provide a proof which will be sent to you online or printed on paper which can be viewed in our store or delivered to you in person.

FAQ

What should the resolution for my image or graphic be?

Resolution should be set at 300 dpi. Image quality is very important in how graphics will reproduce. FYI, Graphics pulled from the internet tend to be 72 dpi and reproduce very poorly. Avoid using those graphics because they will look pixelated when printed. Read More

Do you prefer RGB or CMYK?

If possible, save all graphics in CMYK mode.  RGB do not typically print as true to color as CMYK.... Read More

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